We use stories to:

  • build maps of the world we experience so we can make decisions about how to act.

  • make decisions about what to believe in what we see and hear.

  • playfully simulate possible outcomes before we commit to a course of action.

  • condense experience into packages that re-expand in the minds of listeners.

Cynthia Kurtz – Working with Stories

Your warm but complex embrace

Here is a recent keynote by Dave Snowden giving a thorough overview and introduction to  cynefin and sensemaker, which is packed full of thought provoking insights.

Highly recommended and lasting just over an hour my three favourite quotes are:

(In a complex system) Manage the evolutionary potential of a moment in time and adjust as you go. Manage beneficial coherence within attractors within boundaries.

There is an opportunity between free market capitalism and state planning for locally contextualised initiatives that can emerge at significantly lower cost than either of the other mechanisms.

(In a complex system) measure Vector not Velocity; success is right direction not order; otherwise an unachievable end point is always going to fail.

I had not heard this ‘Vector not Velocity’ before but it reminded me of a story from Nick Owen’s book ‘The Salmon of Knowledge’ about the wise fool:

The wise fool takes the whole context into consideration and looks at every issue from every conceivable angle. Ask him, ‘Which is better, a fast horse or a slow one?’ He will say, it depends. ‘it depends whether you and your horse are going in the right direction

Save the World – A Community workers Masterclass

The RiPPLE Project

Building a community around the local support of COPD in Coventry

Over the years I have worked with many communities, enabling them to make sense of their different perspectives on today, the past and their shared futures, and in doing so, map their narrative landscape.

I have helped them experience their shared Ideality and the benefits they hope to achieve, map their resources and model their current system.

I have begun to catalyse creative and inventive ideas, plotted on cynefin to make sense of complexity and then assessed against their benefits.

I have facilitated problem solving, peer reviewed feedback and storyboarding of these ideas to nurture them into viable, inspiring experiments and projects that gain maximum buy-in.

I have shown them how to use a Kanban to open up their action planning and how to avoid damaging target setting but instead measure the impact of their actions so that they can get “less stories like that and more stories like this”.

During the course of this I have studied Theory U, Asset Based Community Development (ABCD), Participatory Narrative Inquiry (PNI), Cognitive Edge, TRIZ and the work of Steve Denning, Joanna Macey and the Tales2Sustain storyworkers to name just a few of the giants upon whose shoulders we must stand.

I now feel the time is right to give back and share this joined-up, ‘best of the best’, portfolio of knowledge and understanding in the hope that it can be focussed on building local communities resilient, adaptable and sustainable in the face of Austerity, cut backs and 360 degree threats to the environment.

I have therefore set up, as an experiment, the first of what I hope will be many, ‘Change the World, one community at a time’ masterclasses on eventbrite.

This first event will be held in central Peterborough on 15th September. Early bird tickets are available until 15th of August for only £89 for a full day.

If you are interested, and I hope you are, please sign up as soon as possible, and come and join us to share what you know, gain what you need to know and perhaps even learn some things you didn’t even know you needed to know.

Innovation through Knowledge Transfer

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Last week as part of my association with Argenta Nova I attended InnovationKT 2015 which is an international conference focussing on innovation and knowledge transfer, organised by KES International and, this time, hosted by Staffordshire University.

In the keynote by Prof. Ian Oakes, (the president of the Institute of Knowledge Transfer – IKT) I was inspired and excited not just because I had found a new niche in which Innovation and Knowledge (my two favourite hashtags) are being smashed together but also the rider that seems to encompass my favourite area of deployment, Natural Capital, where (as you can see in the slide above) he says:

There is a need for new economic models which do not just rely on depleting natural resources.

He also told an interesting complexity story about how new investment had the reverse effect of taking skilled individuals out of an existing supply chain.

I also loved the two metaphorical definitions he gave of what a university is:

A source of strength like a medieval castle – Lord Dearing

Anchors in local economies – HEFCE

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On the afternoon we had a really interesting guided tour of the Emma Bridgewater pottery works which on the face of it made pottery a COMPLICATED process following clear, good practice steps but it was great to see how individuals are given the freedom to decorate each item as they wish (but only over and above a specified minimum). The number of embedded lessons learned in the process made this an exemplary example of knowledge review, learning and transfer.

On day 2 Dr Steve Welch, director of the KTN (Knowledge Transfer Network) took us through an interesting concept of a pyramid made up of many small creative ideas which could each be useful in another industry. This is similar to but not exactly what Altshuler the Russian inventor, did with his analysis of patents when he derived the TRIZ approach to innovation. I warmed to the idea that merging the individual KTNs would help disseminate creative ideas and knowledge between disciplines, as long as the typical efficiencies and standardisation of a merger is carefully sidestepped.

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My Argenta colleague Alan Drummond and I closed the conference with a facilitated participatory narrative session looking at mapping the narrative landscape of Innovation through Knowledge Transfer. It was good fun, everyone agreed that it had been participatory, very revealing and very useful. I have just produced a workshop session report which is now up on Slideshare here.

It is funny when working with a new group that no-one commented that a big difference between the stories told was that group 2 spoke almost entirely in three letter abbreviations which I think shows a maturity in their method, that they can express complex events in three letters but should act as a warning when they try and fail to communicate with a wider audience.

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Welcome to Narratopia, the story sharing game

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During one of our regular PNI skype chats, Cythia (Kurtz) happened to mention a new game she had created and was prototyping. Called Narratopia and now launched with its own website here but with a full explanation of the rules and ideas behind the game here. I quickly offered to be a guinea pig and a few days later, an airmailed pack arrived at my door.

I mentioned it to my friend Ian and he suggested a game in the Bainton Reading Room which is in a local village just to the North West of Peterborough. We had used this venue for a recent (local) Ted talks evening about storytelling..

Last week we all met up, a nice blue chequered table cloth and very nice red wine and the group of 5 of us set off playing.

It was a very interesting experience all round. We all thought we would just be sharing our own often told stories. The first story was one about an elderly parent in a care home being bought a mobility scooter. A great story that revealed a lot about the storyteller. My question card said “How do you feel about…” and I added “giving such freedom and mobility to your dad”. What followed was a period of deep thought and a true outpouring of emotion and warmth. The other questions were about quite technical and practical aspects of the story. At the end of this round my question was voted by far the best because “it really made me think about our relationship and remember those days so clearly”.

In writing this post I have just checked Cynthia’s blog about Narratopia and was pleased to read her comment about the games intent:

I realized that what should matter most in the game are connections and explorations, because that’s what people do when they share stories. They connect their experiences together, and they explore what their experiences mean.

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The game was deemed a great success by us all. Two hours of non-stop conversation and storytelling, linking stories and exploring our innermost feelings, loosely constrained and helped along by the questions and link cards. I collated everyone’s feedback and sent the pictures and comments to Cynthia in order to improve the playability of the game.

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Oh, and for the record my friend Ian won, so he is now the reigning champion of Bainton, Great Britain and, I think (as it was the first game played here) Europe. So what better prize for a European Narratopia Champion than a bottle of Whitby Heritage real ale.

Get your early order in now to Cythia as I think the first batch will sell out very quickly.