l’hexagone

l'hexagone

l'hexagone

Ever since I started working the cognitive edge methods I have loved working with hexagons. It frustrates me so much when some people line them in linear horizontal or vertical rows and I cannot help but jump in and arrange them more organically (which probably breaks our rule of ‘not leading the witness’). I was most amused on the wikepedia entry for hexagon that France is often known as l’hexagone because of its six sided shape.

Searching for some material on storycircles and inclusionality on the Goodshare website   I began reading Ted Lumleys new book  on ‘A fluid Dynamical Worldview’ and the pictures of hexagonal bee cells and hexagonal soap bubbles caught my eye.  Ted says that “the hexagon is the form that is induced in the dynamic of a collective by the dynamics of the space they are included in”.

He then gets really heavy by suggesting that contrary to Darwinian ‘natural selection’ and competition that “these (bee or bubble) cells are ‘interdependent ‘convection cells’ whose natural ‘ethic’ is energy sharing that seeks to sustain dynamical balance. ie natural collectives work with the opposite intent to that which mainstream science says they do ; ie neighbouring cells do not seek to amass more energy than their neighbours, they seek to sustain dynamical balance through their energy sharing.” 

Its a bit too late at night to get my head completely round what Ted really means, but I like the idea that hexagons emerge from the dynamics of collectives and a process of sharing rather than being physically present naturally (although snowflakes probably fly in the face of this idea). Maybe six is the magic number for working with in a group?

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