TRIZ Inventive Principle 26: Copying

I saw this in a car park in Knaresborough, Yorkshire on Monday. What a great way to deter people from parking in an area that needs to be kept clear, by way of copying a real garage.

TRIZ Inventive principle 26: Copying
A. Replace unavailable, expensive, fragile object with inexpensive copies
B. Replace an object, or process with optical copies.

If you would like to learn more about TRIZ we run regular courses for both engineers and our brand new course of ‘TRIZ for Dummies’. More information here.

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At the Heart of Health

NESTA REPORT

I was very excited to hear that the RIPPLE Project, which emerged from a couple of workshops I facilitated in 2014 for the University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust (in partnership with Coventry University, the British Lung Foundation and local voluntary sector groups in Coventry), is beginning to gain momentum as a prime example of a “Person- and Community-centred approach for Health and Wellbeing.

Yesterday I facilitated a similar workshop in Wolverhampton of 45 patients, matrons, GPS, Hospice workers, Chaplaincy, fire service, community trust, Age UK & voluntary sector to bring together a community (and their assets) as part of a bid to become part of a second tier of six further similar projects in the West Midlands.

Anyway we found out that on Tuesday NESTA, the independent charity that works to increase the innovation capacity of the UK, had published its latest report entitled At the Heart of Health – Realising the value of people and communities, and that the RIPPLE Project was being held as a great example of enabling group activities that can be beneficial to support health and wellbeing.

What they highlight about the RIPPLE Project is:

Group activities in practice: RIPPLE – Respiratory innovation: Promoting a Positive Life Experience

People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) experience chronic ill health and are at risk of early death. The symptoms of COPD, including breathlessness and coughing, can lead to and amplify anxiety, low self-esteem and social isolation. These in turn lower mental wellbeing and can result in both poor self-management and a lack of engagement with key treatments, such as smoking cessation and pulmonary rehabilitation. People can become trapped in a negative cycle where poor self-management leads to worsening symptoms.

As part of the Health Foundation 2014 Shine Programme, University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust took a whole systems approach to this challenge. A broad partnership was set up involving local patients and carers, primary and secondary care clinicians, academics, public health professionals, and third sector organisations to discuss and develop innovative solutions to the social isolation and anxiety observed in individuals with COPD.

After consultation with people living with COPD, the partners decided that an informal community-based clinic would act as a catalyst for increased involvement. This evolved into a group model which blended informal clinic and education sessions with social activities such as bingo, quizzes, singing and seated yoga every Monday afternoon in a community centre.

Results included:

  • Reduced social isolation and anxiety.
  • Increased mental wellbeing.
  • Improved confidence in ability to self-manage.

Preliminary evidence – involving a small number of patients – suggests that attending the RIPPLE programme regularly may reduce the number of unplanned hospital admissions. The patients involved in RIPPLE are chronically ill and as such, you would normally expect their condition to deteriorate, leading to an increase rather than a decrease in hospital admissions. The RIPPLE team has secured additional funding through the Health Foundation’s Spreading Improvement programme which will allow these findings to be further explored.

“Coming here, well, it’s given me a social life I didn’t have before…I feel like a fraud coming here now because I feel so good.”

A couple of other quotes from the report which is probably obvious why they appeal to me are:

In essence, asset-based approaches for health and wellbeing seek to create approaches that are participatory, enabling people to lead action for health, and are underpinned by a focus on what makes us healthy.

As with many community-centred approaches, this is an area where practice on the ground is ahead of the academic research. There is a lack of systematic or review-level academic evidence about asset-based approaches for health and wellbeing.

To date, evidence of effectiveness on asset-based approaches in the UK is limited to a few local, emergent solutions within particular contexts, with little practical guidance on how to put them into practice at scale.

The entire NESTA report can be accessed and downloaded here and is highly recommended.

Review your Flood Plan & lessons learned now

Special 2016 fixed price offer

A fully facilitated Flood Review and Action Planning workshop

floodpic

Have you and your community been flooded, are you worried about the risk of flooding in the future or just wish to make sure you are prepared for the worst?

If you want to inform and influence government policy, funding, national and local action, it is essential to get together and explore options and ideas as soon as possible.

Drawing on my experience of Knowledge Sharing and Inventive Problem Solving I have put together a facilitated workshop that can easily be adapted to suit the specific needs of your community/organisation or local authority.

All you need provide is the participants, a room/space and refreshments.

Whatever your stage in the cycle I can deliver a workshop to meet your current needs.

Consider which of the following you would wish to focus on and email me now for a price and further details.

1. Lessons learned – sharing and capturing stories and insights before they are forgotten.

2. Creating a flood plan (including resource map)

3. Problem solving

4. Creating a flood risk plan

5. Building local cohesion before the next flood.

Putting the workshop together was inspired by this slideshare pack of Analytics to advise a business in Leeds created by Ian Abbot Donnelly, a good friend of mine.

contact details

Ecology of Knowledge Menu V1 front

I have finally managed to create a menu of services that I am happy with. Click on either image to enlarge. The PDF version can be downloaded here, a version complete with prices is available on request..

Ecology of Knowledge Menu V1 no pricesand yes, before you ask, I do have 25 years experience of providing discos and music quizzes so why not end (or punctuate) your event with a participatory musical high.

Innovation through Knowledge Transfer

InKT201501

Last week as part of my association with Argenta Nova I attended InnovationKT 2015 which is an international conference focussing on innovation and knowledge transfer, organised by KES International and, this time, hosted by Staffordshire University.

In the keynote by Prof. Ian Oakes, (the president of the Institute of Knowledge Transfer – IKT) I was inspired and excited not just because I had found a new niche in which Innovation and Knowledge (my two favourite hashtags) are being smashed together but also the rider that seems to encompass my favourite area of deployment, Natural Capital, where (as you can see in the slide above) he says:

There is a need for new economic models which do not just rely on depleting natural resources.

He also told an interesting complexity story about how new investment had the reverse effect of taking skilled individuals out of an existing supply chain.

I also loved the two metaphorical definitions he gave of what a university is:

A source of strength like a medieval castle – Lord Dearing

Anchors in local economies – HEFCE

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On the afternoon we had a really interesting guided tour of the Emma Bridgewater pottery works which on the face of it made pottery a COMPLICATED process following clear, good practice steps but it was great to see how individuals are given the freedom to decorate each item as they wish (but only over and above a specified minimum). The number of embedded lessons learned in the process made this an exemplary example of knowledge review, learning and transfer.

On day 2 Dr Steve Welch, director of the KTN (Knowledge Transfer Network) took us through an interesting concept of a pyramid made up of many small creative ideas which could each be useful in another industry. This is similar to but not exactly what Altshuler the Russian inventor, did with his analysis of patents when he derived the TRIZ approach to innovation. I warmed to the idea that merging the individual KTNs would help disseminate creative ideas and knowledge between disciplines, as long as the typical efficiencies and standardisation of a merger is carefully sidestepped.

InKT201503

My Argenta colleague Alan Drummond and I closed the conference with a facilitated participatory narrative session looking at mapping the narrative landscape of Innovation through Knowledge Transfer. It was good fun, everyone agreed that it had been participatory, very revealing and very useful. I have just produced a workshop session report which is now up on Slideshare here.

It is funny when working with a new group that no-one commented that a big difference between the stories told was that group 2 spoke almost entirely in three letter abbreviations which I think shows a maturity in their method, that they can express complex events in three letters but should act as a warning when they try and fail to communicate with a wider audience.

InKT201504

Ecosystem Thinking for Start-ups – A new workshop

startupseedIn another of my experiments I am, this month, piloting a new workshop/masterclass on developing Start-ups and SME’s. Most of my ecosystem thinking framework design came from working in Government and observing Knowledge Sharing and Innovation in very large commercial organisations. Whereas my experience over the last six years has been as a sole trader/start-up. So I reviewed my lessons learned over the years and have put together a workshop and associated ebook of the methods and tools I have found most useful and beneficial.

I am trial running two one-day workshops (by invitation only) in Peterborough on 22nd October and another in Reading on 4th November, then, subject to participant feedback, I hope to run these more regularly.

The workshop will be structured as a Participatory Narrative Inquiry event, very experiential, punctuated with a number of very useful tools I have picked up along the way. No Powerpoint slides, just face to face stories and instructions. An ebook will hopefully be available in time for the launch event.

My initial thoughts at a top 10 in the order they might be delivered:

  • Exploring what we know already.
  • What are the benefits of being a start-up and of what you do.
  • How to price your services.
  • Making sense of Customers and Products.
  • How to negotiate uncertainty. Predictability and approach.
  • Problem solving in Time and Space to increase your adaptability and resilience.
  • How to prioritise your efforts and creative ideas.
  • Storyboarding your ideas for maximum impact.
  • Managing workflow and measuring impact – focus and minimal wasted effort.
  • Your Social Media Footprint.

I am hoping to pitch these workshops to Development Agencies in Local Councils and Government funded bodies such as the ATI and KTNs, so if you have any connections or ideas around these I would be greatful to hear from you.

Improving project performance – applying an ecosystem framework to project management

ThreeApproachesHot off the Press, I am really excited about a half day workshop in Birmingham on 2nd December I am facilitating for the Association for Project Management (APM) Knowledge SIG on Improving Project Performance – applying an ecosystem framework to project management.

For the event I have simplified my Ecosystem Framework down to its three essential approaches, see above, where I believe I have brought together the very best of the best that allow you to take a full ecosystem view of  the business area you are working within. By combining these approaches and being especially true to the  Participatory Narrative Inquiry (PNI) ethos of Cynthia Kurtz (see below) I hope to demonstrate how a project and project management can be improved strategically and tactically to improve decision making, collaboration and adaptability to name but three potential impacts.

Participatory Narrative Inquiry is an approach in which groups of people participate in gathering and working with raw stories of personal experience in order to make sense of complex situations for better decision making. – Cynthia Kurtz

Anyway, it is safe to assume that this will be an enjoyable afternoon engaging and collaborating with others on the perspective of Project Management. Further details including how to book the workshop can be found here.